click to show more information

click to hide/show information About your Search

20121001
20121031
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
report with the city of miami, a different jurisdiction. that's where club space was located. the cops wouldn't take his report until 24 hours had passed. he had now last seen paula about ten hours before. >> and i'm freaking out. we're from out of town. we're vacationing. it's not like her to be gone this long. >> what happens the rest of sunday night. >> hospitals and jails, i'm calling. >> space, hospitals, jails. >> kevin went back to club space to ask the homeless in the area if they had seen paula earlier that morning. after spreading some money around, he went to a gas station a few blocks away. >> i'm in the taxi. i get out. i go inside. i talk to the clerk. i show him a picture of my girlfriend. >> that's kevin on security camera. i said, have you seen this girl? he says no, i've only been here for an hour or two. >> returning to his hotel room and the sleepless night that followed, he got an idea. call a private detective. he went online and started calling some numbers. the next morning, monday now, one of them a private investigator named dave wasser called kevin back. >> h
home of the middle class, than in cities. we've been following three families as they confronted poverty for the first time. we've been with them on job searches and welfare offices, in their kitchens as they face losing their homes and their futures. yet never losing themselves. diane windemuller is the kind of do it all mom you often meet in the affluent suburbs of boulder, colorado. >> we're going to get some groceries. pasta, rice, cereal, a gallon of milk possibly, and eggs. >> she's an ambitious human resource executive with a masters degree, a husband, three kids, and a comfortable home. so what is diane doing here? >> you're entitled to the government commodities today. could you use rice crispies? >> yes. >> at a food pantry. >> i never imagined we would be in this kind of predicament and for this long. it's so scary there's so many unknowns. >> the windemullers didn't see it coming. three years ago when they moved from michigan to the boulder suburbs. >> i felt that it was kind of like going to mecca because the economy was apparently better over here and the jobs were
park. even as the rest of the world's attention was focused on new york city, they were intent on their own urgent needs, their desires, their fears, their deadly love triangle. so they probably didn't appreciate the passing wonders, the astonishing cliffs, the waterfalls, the giant sa kwoi areas, any more than the one in the back seat through fading eyes saw anything at all. here is one of them. his name was larry mcnabney, a tall handsome man, a well-known and respected attorney from nevada, a personal injury specialist, made buckets of money, loved the big life, loved being in control. >> there was never a hair out of place. there wasn't dust on his desk. his pen was always in the same spot. >> larry's daughter tavia was crazy about him. in all of his type-a personality, his joy of life, his courtroom presence. >> i loved to go to the courtroom and watch my dad. it was mesmerizing to me. >> in command of the place. >> completely confident, not an ounce of shyness. he commanded the courtroom. >> i've been a trial lawyer for over 20 years. >> a good attorney and, perhaps as im
, the former new york city medical examiner and frequent medical expert in high-profile murder cases, reviewed lena's autopsy file and said to him there was no question about it. >> there was no murder. she died of natural causes. >> even lena's mother said she tried to tell detectives that her daughter had suffered frequent fainting spells before her death. that it might indeed have been an accident. but they wouldn't listen. >> how many calls were made to the detective trying to reach -- >> my son, my ex-husband, and myself had to call two -- i would say 25 calls, maybe more. >> it was something you rarely see, a grieving mother defending the man accused of killing her daughter. she said adam was and is like a son to her. >> we are very close than usual, more closer than before. >> do you love adam? >> like my own son. >> and it happened a number of times during a trial. a state witness ended up winning points for the defense. adam's so-called love interest, for example. though it wasn't quite like that. yes, dhated for a while, but adam wasn't going to get deeply involved, she learned. >> a
acclaimed "city island." but he also has a passion for preserving documentaries. particularly his father's. >> the loss of documentary film if it's not preserved is the most, you know, is the saddest loss because it's history. how do you preserve these? in the case of my dad's films, i thought we had the only copies of them. i was determined they had to be preserved. first i donated them to the museum of broadcasting. >> but ray didn't feel that was enough. he wanted his father's work to be seen and appreciated by new audiences. so he posted the mississippi film on his blog where anyone could watch it. >> and almost instantly, my producing partner david zelerford said this is an extraordinary movie and who is booker wright? >> sitting in his office, he said he immediately saw a potential for a new film. one that would finish booker's story. >> he mentions his children in the film, and i said to raymond, i said we have to go find out what happened with booker and his children. >> we started doing research on who booker really was. and we found that there was an article written by a histor
presentation for ahh bra, brought to you by rhonda shear. greetings from the windy city of chicago. people here sure are friendly but some have had a hard time understanding my accent. so to make sure people get every word of the geico savings message i've been practicing how to talk like a true chicagoan. switching to geico could save you hundreds of dollars on car insurance... da bears. haha... you people sure do talk funny. geico®. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. >>> tortola jurors in the case had just finished hearing from 17 prosecution witnesses. one witness that captured their attention in particular was rhode island chiropractor mary basler. >> what about mary? was she your girlfriend on the side? >> she was a girlfriend after shelley's pass. she was not a girlfriend before the passing. >> yet there was a story of a canoodling at her place with a glass of wine and attempted kiss. >> i'm not going to deny that. did i cross a line that i probably in retrospect would like to have back? sure. but there was no intimacy. >> mary was feeling a bit of a
their cars for the last four months. now we've brought the drivers and their parents to new york city to watch the video clips for the first time. parents in one room, teens in another. are any of you nervous about your parents' reaction? >> yeah. >> carissa, you're nervous? >> yeah. >> when we met carissa four months ago, she described herself as cautious. >> i am a very careful driver. >> and she told us using her phone while driving was out of the question. >> you can't talk on your cell phone. obviously you can't text. >> was she able to stick to that rule? her mother's counting on it. >> i'm hoping no texting and driving. that's supposed to be one of our rules. >> carissa's mom was in a serious accident a few years ago when a driver blew through a four-way stop sign. >> the car was smashed up right to where i was sitting. so if my kids would have been with me they would not be here today. >> so this is much more personal having this camera installed in your car. >> yes, it is very serious. >> so how seriously has carissa taken all of her mother's warnings? >> red light, red light
. beware of the scam warns. it's happening in the upscale westchester mall outside new york city at this kiosk where cell phone accessories are sold. like these multipower packs that extend the life of your battery. listing says they're bootlegged, cheap knockoffs of the real thing. meet the man who made those allegations on craigslist. >> it's bootleg. >> how does he know? because he works here and he's blowing the whistle on his own boss. >> do you think your boss has any idea that you've posted that? >> i don't think he does quite honestly. i don't care if he does. >> why would he speak out and risk his job? because, he says, he's learned from his mistakes. in fact, he admits he's a convicted felon. >> you did time? >> i did. >> for burglary? >> burglary. >> ten years? >> yeah. >> what does that say approximate your character as a whistle blower? >> it shows that there is reform, i guess. i don't know. it's like when i did what i did, i was in a different place in my life. i just had a new child, i was battling drug addiction, like my ethics and morals took a back seat to a lo
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)